O’Connell on Freedom (Lampson, 1907)

1.636-37, 10.824-26. G. Locker Lampson, A Consideration of the State of Ireland in the Nineteenth Century, (London: Archibald Constable & Co., 1907), p.107. BL 9508.d.13

An extract from G. Locker Lampson, A Consideration of the State of Ireland in the Nineteenth Century, quoting Daniel O’Connell.

In his chapter on ‘Catholic Emancipation’, having first quoted a speech delivered by Daniel O’Connell on the 22nd of March, 1824, in Limerick, in which ‘The Liberator’ made clear his opposition to “all tendencies to disorder,” Lampson then offers the following account, which has a clear bearing on Haines’s remarks, and Stephen’s meditation on the ‘blow’ by which he might achieve freedom from his two imperial masters:

On December 17, 1824, O’Connell delivered a speech at the Catholic Association in which he eulogized Simon Bolivar and the methods employed by him to attain the liberty of a people. For this he was prosecuted, but the grand jury, which was composed of persons of various political opinions, threw out the bills on January 1. By 1825 the Association had, by dint of indomitable perseverance and courage bred of a great cause, become very formidable to the Government. Within two years after its origin the penny subscriptions to the rent averaged £500 a week, representing half-a-million enrolled associates, and O’Connell began to feel himself strong enough to show his hand. Even some years before this time he had ventured in a speech to quote the lines — “Hereditary bondsmen! know ye not, who would be free, themselves must strike the blow?”

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