‘Flush’ and the Power of the Satirist (Robinson, 1912)

1.200. Fred Norris Robinson, ‘Satirists and Enchanters in Early Irish Literature’ in David Gordon Lyon and George Foot Moore, eds., Studies in the History of Religions: Presented to Crawford Howell Toy by Pupils Colleagues and Friends, (New York: The Macmillan Company, 1912), p. 110. BL 4503.k.5

Extract from Fred Norris Robinson, ‘Satirists and Enchanters in Early Irish Literature’ (1912).

Mulligan’s heightened colour may have to do with a power anciently associated with the Irish bard:

Several words [in the ninth- or tenth-century Cormac’s Glossary] are . . . explained as having to do with the satirist or his work. Leos is defined as “a blush wherewith a person is reddened after a satire or reproach of him”; and one meaning of ferb is said to be “a blotch which is put on the face of a man after a satire or false judgment.”

Advertisements